Jewish Cemetery Trust

Beit Tephilla

The Beit Tephilla or House of Prayer was designed by the Trustees as an alternative to a graveside service. This small prayer room holds approximately 40 people, and has been well received by the community as a alternative for smaller services.

Beit Tephilla next to Jewish Cemetery Trust Office

This beautiful House of Prayer generously endowed by
Mr Lionel Green
in honour of his late father
Mr Simon Green,
a past chairman of the Jewish Cemetery Trust, who during his life time contributed much to the needs of the Jewish Community


The intricate lead lights were constructed by a Sydney based company “Sugar Loaf”. If you look carefully at the glass surrounding the doorway you will start to see the various elements symbolic to Judaism.

When asked what his inspiration was for the larger lead light window panel, lead light designer Phil Field replied.
“The journey of life... the design in the foreground could be a country scene of rolling hills or even a seascape giving the feeling of a journey.
The sunset signifies the end of a day and the end of a journey. Some may interpret the sunset as sunrise instead, signifying a new day or beginning. The question to ponder is... is this the end of our loved ones journey or the start of a new one for them, one they must start without us?
At the same time, it is an ending for us as our loved one is no longer with us, It is also a new beginning for us, possibly with new responsibilities as head of the family or perhaps as a single person.
In short, it is my interpretation of journeys, endings and beginnings the cycle of life if you will.
I hope this window helps people through their period of loss to find some peace.”
Phil Field-Sugarloaf Leadlight Studios

Stained Glass at Beit Tephillah next to Jewish Cemetery Trust Office Stained Glass at Beit Tephillah next to Jewish Cemetery Trust Office Stained Glass at Beit Tephillah next to Jewish Cemetery Trust Office